Brexit and Mental Health

brexit

Brexit, like it or not is a reality. 54% of the public voted in a referendum for us to leave the EU. I watched with despair as events unfolded and was almost praying for us to stay in as I feared that a Brexit decision could really send my End Of Terror situation spiralling out of control. Post-Brexit, if I believed in restricting people’s liberties for thought crime and nowt else and I had the power as a psychiatrist, then maybe I’d be sentencing 54% of the population for section detainment in mental hospitals for making a completely irrational decision in voting, a decision I believe that long term will make the entire UK suffer, economically, politically and more importantly, to End Of Terror, within the mental health system.

Why the big fear, you may ask? Firstly, one of the core components of EU membership is that EU citizens have access to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. This court, although I’ve never used it personally, acts as a safeguard for human rights. I’ve always dreamed of getting over to Strasbourg and felt that it would be one of the only places in which to get justice for End Of Terror. I will never realise that goal. But,many good things have come from Strasbourg over the years and indirectly it has safeguarded all those unnecessarily under the cosh, detained in UK mental health institutions. One piece of legislation that has been delivered through the presence of the EU Human Rights Court, is our own country’s Human Rights Act (1998). This Act came into being under the supervision of the Tony Blair government and basically enshrined EU Human Rights legislation into British Law.

I have always felt that the Human Rights Act is incompatible with the Mental Health Act. The fundamental freedoms it enshrines are usurped once the Mental Health Act is invoked. I have constantly tried to argue a Human Rights case for myself, even in the Mental Health Tribunal Courts, quoting the United Nations Universal Declaration on Human Rights and referring to Strasbourg and indeed the Human Rights Act. Most debate, however, falls on deaf ears, and the tribunal courts tend to favour the misplaced incorrect mindset of Mental Health Workers who generally claim that the Mental Health Act is more important than any human rights legislation and overrides it. Treatment against consent is my main bugbear with the Mental Health Act and any fool can see that this is incompatible with virtually all that Human Rights laws suggest.

Brexit has created not just deep divisions in society, but also a pre-Revolution like political fallout. Both major parties – Labour and Conservative, are quarrelling within their ranks and their infighting is spilling over into a tense political anarchy, spreading like wildfire across the Nation. Brexiteers are abandoning their pre-referendum promises and also withdrawing on the whole from their ideology, as they resign from political decisions, themselves surprised that they duped the British voting public so wonderfully. I need not mention the falls of Boris Johnson, Nigel Farage, Michael Gove, all leading campaigners for Brexit, who have all not quite stood up to their vision. The reality is that there is a great political awkwardness lying in the immediate future for those decision-makers that have to actually go ahead and invoke Article 5o of the European Constitution and officially make the UK no longer an EU member. These shirkers will rear their ugly heads at some distant point in the future to carry on their warped visions and lies.

It was already a major part of David Cameron and the Conservative Party’s plans to terminate the Human Rights Act and to replace it with a UK Bill of Rights. The Human Rights Act was a Labour policy and is loathsome to rightist politicians. It is a safeguard that protects and restricts Conservative policies. Perhaps a tonic to Cameron as he resigned in the wake of Brexit, was that Britian leaving the EU would enhance the powers of those opposed to Human Rights legislation as the people of this country would no longer be able to challenge the UK government in Strasbourg, thus consolidating more power in Westminster. However, the Brexit fallout is not all rosy for the mental health system and those who rely on the comfort of human rights. Theresa May is our new unelected Prime Minister, avoiding even the vote selection for leader of the Conservatives from within the party ranks. At End Of Terror we have already pleaded with Theresa May to sort out the situation with Mental Health and Policing in South East Wales. She was home secretary for the vast duration of the period when the police and mental healthers stepped up their violent pursuit, culminating in them opening fire on me with a taser through the letterbox at home (see articles on Police Brutality and Mental Health). I tweeted Theresa May but like David Cameron, she just completely ignored End Of Terror, a response that we are well used to seeing from policymakers and the powers that be, in general. Theresa May is dangerous to Mental Health as she has some radically twisted views on human rights and wherever possible has exercised her parliamentary powers to vote against any form of human rights that would protect people within the Mental Health system. I just hope that now she has reached her zenith of power, in being Prime Minister, that perhaps she has the responsibility to change her views. She promises a better Britain for all and I pray she delivers this FOR ALL, and not just the privileged few.

It’s not all bad, perhaps, for mental health detainees. I’ve pondered Brexit substantially and one of the possible benefits could be that due to the falling pound, the departure from the Common Market and tighter budget restrictions there could be a corresponding fall in budget expenditure for mental health and policing. Mental Health spending was supposed to reach parity with Physical Health spending and this goal is far from being realised and is very distant on the horizon. I think that in a shrinking economy with less access to European markets, psychiatry, whose total reliance on Big Pharma with its almost pure dedication to pharmaceuticals, may be forced to tighten its purse strings. A lot of psychiatric medicines are produced abroad and imported into the UK. With the pound demolished and the exchange rate to Euro and indeed dollar damaged, the cost of bulk buying mental health medicines from abroad could almost double in real terms. Tariffs on European imports will further exacerbate these costs. Will we see a move towards non-pharmaceutical interventions in mental health? Will the oft-neglected talking therapies enter fashion? Will the taxpaying public support rising pharmaceutical expenditure, on drugs that are very iffy at best and have no scientific or medical foundation?

Looking towards the Mental Health Review Tribunal Courts, any change in Human Rights legislation could alter the way that they work. Most people are not aware that the current status quo has been changed slightly in favour of patients at Tribunals due to the Human Rights Act. At present the onus of responsibility in the courts for burden of proof falls upon the detaining authority to prove that ongoing detention of an appealing patient is warranted. Any loss of human rights laws could lead to a reversal of this situation thus making the patient’s job of appealing against section detainment even more difficult. Already the courts decisions are heavily weighted to rule against patients, with only approximately 5% of appeals resulting in success for patients.

An interesting point to note and one that I have already touched upon in a previous article – Immigrant Doctors on the NHS – Will there be fewer foreign doctors and therefore psychiatrists as a result of Brexit? I do not believe that positions of such power and responsibility should be allocated to immigrants in psychiatry. I do not feel that foreigners truly understand the nature of our society as they have not been nurtured in it. I would welcome fewer immigrant psychiatrists. However, on the flipside, I think that fewer foreign mental patients, nurses and cleaners could be detrimental to mental hospitals as it would essentially reduce the complexity of the usual rich biodiversity of nationalities they contain. I’m sure foreign patients such as the Italian Allesandra Pacchieri might be glad not to be in the UK mental health system, most certainly after her terrifying ordeal here.

Research is one area of society dependant on Europe and its links with universities across Europe, sharing their studies and cross-funding. Already the science of mental health is most imprecise – it is a pseudoscience at best. The lack of research as a consequence of Brexit will leave us ever deeper in the dark ages of this medieval-like system of torture.

On the whole I think that Brexit produces a new, more isolated society with fewer safeguards in place that will lead to more suffering for mental patients and an increased government reliance on the oppressive system that mental health provides. Isolation and a warped power sense triggered the rise of Nazism in 1930s Germany. Remember that post WW2, one of the mechanisms set up to prevent the incidence of Nazism from ever reappearing, was the creation of closer international co-operation via the European Union. It mustn’t be forgotten that one of the first groups of people Hitler tested the concentration camp system upon were Germany’s mental patients. Often it is in times of crisis that mental patients’ suffering is at its most acute.

Brexit Britain, cast adrift from continental Europe, will be a lonesome island, its asylums even lonelier, darker, more eery than ever. Big Pharma is too far embedded to disappear and I fear that the new government, most certainly outside of the European safeguard mechanisms, will further erode human rights making an easier triumph for the fascist powers that control mental health and perpetuate modern day psychiatric slavery.

Interesting internet articles:

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/29/eu-referendum-mental-health-vote

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Rights_Act_1998

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Court_of_Human_Rights

http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

 

 

 

Thatcher Thatcher, Freedom Snatcher

thatcher thatcher

This article is inspired by a bad dream that has just woken me up at 0740am.

‘Without a doubt, princes become great when they overcome difficulties and obstacles that are imposed upon them; and therefore fortune, especially when she wishes to increase the reputation of a new prince, who has a greater need to acquire prestige than a hereditary prince does, creates enemies for him and has them take action against him so that he will have the chance to overcome them and to climb higher up the ladder his enemies have brought him. Therefore many judge that a wise prince must, whenever he has the occasion, foster with cunning some hostility so that in stamping it out his greatness will increase as a result.’ Niccolò Machiavelli (in The Prince)

Politics according to Machiavelli is an evil and ruthless game of cunning and to be honest is something which I do not relish. I find it boring and full of wicked people. Every so often in life, however, we are dealt a strange twist of fate and end up staring straight down the barrel at the perils of the political system created by our masters. I write this article as a moment of inspiration, though with a touch of antecedent clairvoyance and inevitability. The time is now and while the IRON LADY still lives on and is yet to draw her last breath I thought I’d pencil some thoughts into print.

Margaret Thatcher is a name one associates with British politics at the very least. A striking figure who cut the world stage at an exciting time of history, of that there is no doubt, but here are some of my words that I wish to get published to my blog all ready to be posted at the time of her death as the world readies itself for public outpourings of grief, mingled with images of torn bodies of victims of the Falklands conflict and the strikes of brutalised South Wales miners.

I grew up in South Wales though was too young to appreciate what was happening during the miners’ strike. However, my earliest memories of politics came to me at playgroup when a woman announced that free milk was being stopped for all children and that when we went onto infants school we would no longer qualify for a nice cold jar of white midmorning. The Korovo Milkbar’s playground rang to the tune of ‘Thatcher Thatcher, Milk Snatcher!’ as we, bereft of our beloved Moloko Vellocet, marched out to the tunes that the older kids had drilled into us. The lady on the news had made her feelings known and though I understood not why, politics had reared its ugly head for the first time in my life.

Free milk or not, my feelings for Thatcher have arisen through my latter years of contact with the system’s antics. In my short thirty-two years of life I have unpleasantly witnessed on about 8 separate occasions, government employees issuing me with rights leaflets about detention under the mental health act. Clearly printed on every leaflet is that the act issues from 1983, passed during Thatcher’s time as prime minister. The act gives far-reaching powers to the government to lock people up, in contrary to their rights under the Magna Carta or indeed UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in psychiatric institutions. Surely mental hospitals are necessary and a place where sick people go to be cured? I tell you for a fact that mental hospitals are not full of dangermongers waiting to cut you up on the streets or boil your children alive. Psychiatry is a modern evil, a subject with no antiquity in its distant past, no foundation for Freud’s nonsense in a classical education. Psychiatry is a system of torture founded on the principles of chemically altering the brains of laboratory animals and passing on the control methods to those that rule the masses. As a science it cannot claim to exist as there is no scientific proof of any of the illnesses psychiatry diagnoses and treats, let alone cures. It is plain and simple torture and masquerades in the public eye as a humane necessity, disguising the real fact that it is a tool of oppression.

Thatcher passed the Mental Health Act law as it stands during her time as head of government and for that I thank her not. Subsequent governments have amended the act and in particular, if you question the political polarity of this read, a certain Tony Blair, who introduced the far-reaching powers of CTO or Community Treatment Orders under which I currently reside.

What I wish for is that my human rights are respected and that the Mental Health Act should be abolished. This will never happen as we live in dark times. Perhaps I should let my vengeful side reside a little and hope that during Baroness Margaret’s lifetime she should experience a little taste of her own medicine. Maybe 15 baton-wielding, handcuff-toting plastic-clad coppers could break into her bed lairs and pounce on her unawares. She could be presented with the last clear picture a disciplined mind gets to see; a rights form of the Mental Health Act. 3 pages of printed nonsense detailing how you can appeal against the butchery that is about to occur. A foreign immigrant doctor gives the signal and under the auspices of an army of malicious social workers, your local friendly GP and with the dutiful aid of a torture-trained team of nurse thugs she could be pinned down and viciously stabbed repeatedly in her arse with heavy duty tranqulisers and left to rot in the cells for a prolonged period, force-fed on the faeces of NHS canteens, experiencing at every waking moment the dulcet drone of psychiatric patient indoctrination. The system works and perhaps justice would be served if the freedom that politicians are supposed to protect came to be suspended from them. The public do not know what this murky blanket covers and have a right to be told. Margaret Thatcher to me is a tyrant, and has snatched my freedom.

What political system could save me, what could be different? The masses blindly follow their leaders and rarely question in detail how they act. History writes its own tale. We look back at the brutality of certain regimes such as that of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia where millions starved to death and mountains of skulls dotted the highways under the auspices of Pol Pot’s army of black-clad child soldiers. He was only investing his methods into the minds of the youth. He empowered them and probably never suspended their free school milk. Yet he will be marked out as an evil man. How will Thatcher be remembered? No doubt statues will go up but I bet there won’t be many in South Wales. I speak from the heart and I am sure that there won’t be a mass exodus of coaches from my local area to attend her funeral. I’d like to be there, of course, just so I could get a glimpse of her arse and see if the friendly Mr Piggys left any battle scars on her, prior to the onslaught she suffered after fifty rounds of needles in her bum.

Many of you reading this will know me and may join in the banter of calling me a lunatic and many of you will believe that I am a sick person in some way. It is only natural to do so, but examine the facts yourself and ask yourselves what you have laid witness to yourselves in my presence. Am I a danger? Is the government’s torture of me justified? Does it help make society a better place?

I end this rant and leave you in peace, but I implore you to never accept the loss of your freedom or personal dignity. Greatness will follow you, of the questioning mind, every way your interrogating hearts allow you in your drives for thirsty success in life. Remember ye, the good people you meet on your travels, and do kindness and be generous to all those that surround you. You will lead a healthy life and be prosperous. Freedom exists.

(from an old archived blog article I wrote on 22/08/2010)

http://djwezg.com/thatcher-thatcher-freedom-snatcher-22082010-189